My expensive Internet slippers tried to kill me

Um…I’m a tad bit bruised around the nose area you might say.

It’s been a good long time since I took a good tumble.

I haven’t bragged about it much. Especially whilst suffering from the dizzies and woozies during this last relapse because it felt a little like tempting fate. I’m brave. I tempt fate a lot. But I hate to fall, so call me conservative on tempting the falling god, I wasn’t gonna brag about it. I’m sure wherever she is, God of Dramatic Falls would love to look down upon me and smite me something good.

And lo! So it was that I was visited by the God of Dramatic Falls earlier in the week, in front of not one, but three guests (one was a baby and she barely noticed, bless her heart). Since one of those guests was my mother, this was not the most convenient time to have such a dramatic battle with gravity as I think I nearly gave her a heart attack from the panic.

The thing is, it wasn’t entirely because of my MS that I took this expertly choreographed nose dive into pointy corner of the wooden post that supports my stairs and railing. It was only partially because of my MS but mostly it was because of my formerly favorite slippers.

You may have heard of them. They are advertised all over the internets just waiting for suckers like me to spend much too much money on a pair of slippers. I mean, why buy regular old cheap slippers when you can spend way too much on these! They’re called Mahabis.

What lured me in to buying Mahabis (not once, but twice I might add) was this awesome rubber bottom that attached to the wool slipper with a nifty little snap at the back of the slipper essentially making these slippers indoor/outdoor friendly.

I wear them a lot when I’m home since many slippers are deadly to me because they are too slippery on my mostly hardwood floors so I liked the rubber sole option. Also, as you might be aware, I spend a lot of time in lounge wear. It’s kind of nice to be able to run out to, say, the pharmacy, the grocery store, to the trash bins outside – or even to a restaurant for early-bird special sushi dinner (hypothetically).

I actually did this just a few short days ago.

I went out in my lounge wear, covered in cat hair, sporting epic bed head and wearing my snazzy indoor/outdoor slippers. The sushi was wonderful. My dinner companion unfazed by my obvious lack of cleanliness. My psyche only slightly damaged by being in public among the people after actual dark. I mean, it was 7PM when we left the restaurant but to me it felt like midnight. The miracle slippers look like this and they come to your house in a fancy box:

The slippers of death.

But I digress. Back to the story at hand…

I was picking up a dish that I had set out with some cakes for my guest to nibble with her tea while she sat on my couch feeding tiny adorable little baby Stella. I wanted to get the dish out of her way and carry it into the kitchen. Easy, right? Sure. Definitely. No biggie. My mom was in a chair across the room chatting with my friend about her formula that she has shipped in from Germany and how different it was back when my mom had her babies etc etc. In other words, she was distracted or she would have never allowed me to attempt to clean up the table all by myself.

I had the dish of cakes in one hand, absolutely nothing in the other and began to walk toward my kitchen completely unaware that the tiny snap that holds the rubber bottom to the top of the slipper had come unsnapped. The rubber bottom was unattached from the top of the slipper like a giant floppy tongue. It caught on the area rug runner I have going from the front door toward the kitchen and sent me and my dish of cakes flying forward.

As I was going down, because as I explained earlier my damn foot was stuck (flappy rubber bottom thingy was stuck between my slipper top and the rug), I was thinking omg, omg, omg, omg, no, no, no, no, not now, not here, NOT in front of my mother (she’ll never stop worrying about me now)…When BOOM. My face hit the corner of the wooden post of my stair railing, the dish went flying and the cakes spewed every which way.

Falling is both horrible and terrifying. It also feels like it’s not actually happening because in your mind, you had absolutely zero intention of doing the worm on your belly like you were attending a super crazy frat party. But somehow you are now lying face down in your living room on the hard wood floor absolutely stunned.

My first reaction was to feel my nose to see if I’d broken it because I hit that point on the wooden post face first and I hit it hard. To be honest, it hurt like I broke it but there was no blood which seemed like a good sign to me. It was throbbing, however, and that felt like a very bad sign. It felt bigger than usual on one side.

Whilst I was falling to the floor in a violent, messy, manner my mother jumped up from her chair and practically sprinted across the living room toward where I lay, to see if I’d survived. All I can say is thank the goddess that she wasn’t holding that 6-week old baby at the time because she just may have tossed her in the air in her frantic adrenaline powered panic to get across the room to me, still on the floor face down.

Falling is also surreal. When you sit yourself up you are in utter amazement, astonished that your body just did what your body just did. It just feels so wrong! As if things like that shouldn’t be possible in a decent world. I was dazed and in pain looking at cake strewn all over the floor and assuming shards of plate scattered over the hardwood floor. My mom had my face in her hands as she examined me to make sure I was actually and truly OK. I looked a little forward and saw the plate the cakes were on sitting under the leg of a small stool, unbroken. I gestured for my mom to get it before we pushed down on the stool and shattered it into a million pieces. I remember thinking…how the hell did the plate get UNDER the leg of that stool without getting broken? It didn’t seem possible in a sensible universe but this universe I live in is anything but sensible, so OK sure, I’ll accept the unbroken plate as a good outcome of an unpleasant, unplanned bit of acrobatics.

I did try to get up to get the plate myself, but my mother firmly told me to sit the hell down and stay still. She had already picked up the cakes, got my cordless vacuum from the kitchen and was cleaning the mess. Every time I tried to offer to get up and help, she gave me a look and I immediately stopped trying and sat the hell down. I’ve seen that look many times before over the course of my 50+ years.

It was the same look she has given me all of my life when I knew I was about to experience the full wrath of the powerful force that is the quintessential fully-in-charge-of-the-situation mother who loves you but is not having your crap right now. Whether it was for telling a lie and getting caught (“Tell the truth and shame the devil, Bethie”) or whether it was for taking a loan and not paying it back (“I should have named you crime because you don’t like to pay”) or whether it was for upsetting her in any of a hundred of ways…I got the look. I stopped. Did as I was told. The end. It was that same look she gave me each time I tried to get up.

I should emphasize the “trying” part of that sentence. That’s where the MS thing comes in. I was shaking, my legs no longer operational, my body aflame in pain pretty much all over. I had to crawl to the carpeted steps on my hands and knees (attractive) to get a good hold in order to hoist myself up. All the while, my friend is still feeding her beautiful baby telling me it was no big deal, don’t be embarrassed, everyone falls etc etc etc (and me feeling every one of those things was very far from the truth but grateful to her for saying them).

I couldn’t walk completely upright because of searing pain in my lower back. I fell on my face and somehow hurt my back? Even I’m impressed with that feat. My legs shook and felt inoperable as I stood up. My face throbbed. Today, two days post-fall, my nose has reached new levels of purple, it looks to be spreading to my eyes a bit and my shoulders and upper arms are sore like I lifted weights yesterday during a good, long workout. I didn’t do that. Obviously.

So, there you have it. My no-falling streak starts over as of last Friday. I made it almost 18 months on my feet the last time. I’m gonna try for two years this time. You know I like a good challenge. I’ll try to achieve this goal because my body didn’t really need the additional pain that comes with falling, on top of the regular old pain I’m always feeling. Nor did my face need redecoration of this particular sort.

Only 8 more days until Ocrevus infusion number 2. Let’s hope it does some magic and gives this body a little boost.

My body could use a damn break. And I’m not talking about my nose.

The Darkest Places (So Far)

In other words, when you get a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis that you weren’t expecting late-ish in life and let those words sink in, you understand viscerally that this is definitely not a good development. Things are about to change from top to bottom and every where in between. You pretty much get that from the very beginning (for me, early December 2015). You have to tell people who love you, first. Those are dark days indeed.

As you read and do some early research and find some voices you rely on for reliable information you feel yourself wanting to be hopeful, wanting all of those voices to be true. The voices of the Societies and Foundations and all the rest. This whole MS thing will be bad for a good long while, but it WILL get better. You will find your legs (bad choice of words or the perfect set of words. Depends on how you look at it). Just believe it. Hang in there. MS doesn’t have you!

The lazy writer in me wants to use the eye roll emoji in this post at this particular juncture. You get on that “MS doesn’t have me bus” and you listen to friends tell you stories about their friends (or friends of friends sister’s aunt twice removed) and she runs marathons with MS. Surely you can do that too! Chin up, buttercup. Better days are on the way.

And I do know there are better days on the way. Currently, better days are in speedy delivery mode as I choked down the most bitter giant 10 chalky tablets of prednisone ever made this evening after a command performance today with The Great Scott.

When TGS calls you and says be here at 1:40PM well…you put on your best black yoga pants/tank top combination. You have 75 identical versions of each so it’s a complex decision making process. You run your lint roller over your freshly laundered daily uniform because with four felines running around, and over, every surface of every item in my home that I’ve not left all that much in the last 6 or so weeks, you can’t be too careful. You don’t want TGS thinking you’re that cat lady (even though you are much much worse than that cat lady…he doesn’t need to know that). You pop an antivert and you get your growing behind off the couch to see the wizard.

And that is exactly what I did.

The Great One himself had two new students, Kyle and another Samir but not the same Samir from the last time. This Samir had some shiny and very voluminous black hair styled in a casual, not-over-done hipster doctor pompadour. It was really something. I’m a hair girl! I can’t help it. Kyle didn’t have a chance. I was covetous of Samir’s hair. Samir’s hair should have an Instagram account because MS’ers all over would follow him.

When Samir was doing my visual fields test and I had to stare at his fingertip and at his nose over and over again, I kept finding myself staring at his hair and he would say, “Down here, Maribeth” and I definitely blushed.

But I digress. After we went through the whole visual field song and dance again, twice, with each student, TGS talks to all of us as if we’re buddies. I think I’m officially one of them, now, based purely on the volume of times I’ve had to be in there in the last 6 months. He asked Kyle what we learn from the visual field test (the whole follow my finger, look at my nose routine). It was almost like TGS knew I was about to blurt out the answer and he look at me and silently shook his head ever so subtly, “Don’t.” (So I didn’t.)

Poor Kyle whiffed on both of his quiz questions. The other one was, “Can you tell me what other drugs beyond meclazine we sometimes use to manage vertigo caused by brain lesions Kyle?” I knew! I’ve been a vertigo researching fool these past 6 weeks or so. I KNOW THIS ONE TOO…I got the look again. I kept my mouth shut, again.

TGS is not pleased that his students appear to be dullards on this subject. Kyle actually stuttered. Poor Kyle.

“Sometimes we use benzos for this reason and we’re going to try that here to help Maribeth out. Also, Maribeth, this drug may kill two birds with one stone because I’m putting you on another course of high dose steroids starting today,” deadpanned The Most Great of all Scotts.

NOOOOOOoooooooooooooooOOOOOOOoooooooo!

“Ugh.” I actually said this. “Isn’t there any other option? I mean MORE steroids? I’m kind of tired of the steroid effect TGS. I just am. I know that makes me a shallow asshole but there has to be another option.”

“Well, there’s plasma replacement blah-blahtity-blah but that is an in-patient experience, is not likely to work and is really a terrible idea so we can probably agree not to go there, can’t we? You have an aggressive disease. A lot more aggressive than we thought. You like being aggressive in treatment, right? We need to give you a chance. This should help you over this hump until your next Ocrevus infusion in early November. I’m still hopeful this drug is going to be right for you, Maribeth. But you do have me re-thinking the two month flush for patients like you. I may be changing my mind on the necessity of things getting this bad before they get better.”

He has a point. I’m nothing if not aggressive.

I do the walking tests. He continues to be concerned that I am back to pre-Tysabri levels of impairment (old symptoms have come back with a vengeance). Couple that with the vertigo that just won’t quit and he’s pretty sure I can cancel my appointment with the Hearing & Balance Center. (I’m kind of bummed. I was planning to go in costume since it’s kind of close to Halloween. I was going to dress up as a crazy old woman with a broken brain who’s lost her damn mind.) So, no Halloween fun for BethyBright. Boo.

I look down. I know I am beaten. He’s not called The Great Scott for nothing. I’ll take the fucking steroids.

Here’s the thing. I know some of you get this because you have been there. Hell. You might be there right now. You know what I mean. It’s a period of time so bad that weird shit starts to happen to you inside of your broken brain. You have thoughts that people like you just don’t usually have. You think to yourself, as you consider these random scary thoughts, “Huh. I don’t normally think things like this.” That’s another concerning relapse-associated “symptom” that the docs don’t talk much about.

You find yourself mildly afraid to leave the house. The outside world starts to represent potential injury and/or embarrassment or both, so you find yourself not wanting to go out there. At all. Ever. But staying in here? That’s another story entirely.

Staying in here is where it’s relatively safe (at least you can puke in private?). But staying in here sends a girl down some dark rabbit holes…

  • What did I do to deserve this? What am I being punished for? (I have some ideas, but I thought I was over all of that. Guess I’m not.)
  • Why do I live in this house that means I need help to do the most basic stuff? Why do I deserve to live in this happy place with so much freaking STUFF? I should give away all of this cursed stuff. We’re all under the same evil eye, my stuff and me. It should go, too. It’s cursed. I am cursed. We should all GO.
  • Why do I have so many damn cats? Why do they need so so much? I should never have been optimistic enough to get all of these needy, bitchy creatures. I should have known it would all go to shit! It usually does. Literally. Then I’ll need even MORE help to carry that shit out of the damn cursed house.
  • Why would anyone want to talk to me now? This utter nightmare is the ONLY thing I ever think about, let alone talk about. When I talk about it to my visitors, those kind enough to come to me for human contact, I find myself on my own damn nerves. There just isn’t a way to sugar coat any of this. I know if the tables were turned I’d leave your house feeling sadder than sad because we used to have so many other, more pleasant things to talk about. Now I have this. Only. This.
  • I’m alone. I rely on the graciousness of others. This is my reality. I am blessed (#blessed – few things irritate me more than #blessed I’m not entirely sure why but every time I see it, it sounds ironic to me). I have so many friends, family and buddies who help me in so many ways because they love me. Hell. They even help me by just giving me tiny little happy surprises! Like the card last week that I needed at just the right moment. But really how long can any of this last? People WILL get sick of me not getting better. It’s just inevitable. I’m so needy that there isn’t any realistic number of humans on the planet to fulfill all of my damn needs. It’s just not physically possible. I mean I am with me all of the time and I’m sick of me not getting better. What happens when I get worse? Or when I get MUCH worse…I can’t really think about that for very long or I go to darker places still.
  • Are there darker places than this? Oh I know there are. I have a feeling I might visit them before this is all over

I may have seriously entertained not taking the damn steroids. I definitely considered it, I may have come close to skipping my stop at the pharmacy. I’m so tired of all of the stupid side effects of fucking steroids! Why do I have to have a disease that makes me LOOK bad too. Why couldn’t I get a disease that makes you look scarily thin? Trust me. I know. These are idiotic, stupid pointedly indulgent obnoxious thoughts. I thought these idiotic thoughts the whole way home from seeing TGS.

Then I thought about how I had a virtual anxiety attack over leaving my house today. I have never had a true anxiety problem in my life. Other problems, sure, but not anxiety. And how doing basic chores has me so exhausted that I think my entire life is going to feel this way. For all time. Forever and ever until I just give up and stop, stop doing all the things let it all go to shit and just sleep. Because I am alone I am and will always be…This, my therapy loving friends is what my precious Cheryl would call “catastrophic thinking.”

Then it hit me. Out of the blue in full-on pedal to the medal on my way to Catastrophy USA, I finally got my head straight. Like BOOM.

The disease is talking right now. Not me. The disease is talking stupid because it wants to win. Its only reason to exist is to ruin me. It wants me to be depressed, full of newfound anxiety, falling apart at the seams. It wants me to hate on this body it wants to feed on because it makes the whole process so much easier, more easily digestible. Like tenderizing meat before you cook it. Those are NOT my thoughts.

When I feel better, my thoughts will be my thoughts again.

I took the damn first dose of bitter pills. They won’t be my last. I need to accept this and I have. I’ll eat sensibly and try not to go on an ice cream binge (prednisone needs no assistance in achieving maximum bloat) but I will have a couple of spoonfuls every now and then if it will give me some much needed joy.

It gets really dark in this world. Scary thoughts can kick you right in the gut and have you questioning your sanity. Your fundamental worth. Then you get to that point where you start to realize that maybe a nice gentle marinade would be ever so much more appealing on the meat than all of that beating it with a spiky metal mallet has been.

(I know at least one of my blog followers read that last paragraph and giggled thinking, “She said beat the meat! Hee Hee.” You know who you are!)

I’m going to marinade in some prednisone and some calming benzos and let this thing ride. Cliches are a thing because most of a time, they have more than a little nugget of truth inside.

And you know when they say it’s always the darkest.

Technical difficulty: LOW (or is it?)

A metaphor for life with MS.

So I thought today was a simple day. I had meetings all morning that were best done on the phone from home (whew). Then I happily noticed that it is indeed Tuesday, and based on my last post, my 3PM appointment on Tuesdays was even more critical than usual for it was with my precious, otherwise known as Cheryl, my therapist.

I woke up feeling dizzy again. I called Nurse Carol and begged for more drugs because more times than not this week, I get the dizzies then I get the sickies and that kind of puts a damper on leaving the house (which implies moving around which appears to be the thing that makes me even dizzier). I took my meds today since I knew there were more meds waiting for me at the pharmacy and I no longer needed to ration the glorious puke-killing pills. Another great reason to leave the house!

I was feeling shaky though so I decided to depend on my new friend Stan, my very sophisticated but simple black cane.

There were crews working outside at two houses across my street and I didn’t relish the idea of getting from my house to my porch to my car (a relatively low difficulty task) but there’s a rather longish stretch of grass to get to my car without a railing to hold on to – and, well. I wasn’t willing to face plant in front of two teams of remodeling men.

I used Stan. I got to my car. I turned on my car and realized I didn’t have my mobile phone (“Beth’s Iphone cannot be found” my car informed me)…Well dammit. I had to do it again – the low difficulty trek from my car TO my front door. My legs are now tired. Then it hit me…my phone was actually upstairs on my second floor. I had to climb the steps.

OK then! I can do this. I climb the steps on shaky legs, holding onto the railing to keep from falling, and grab my stupid phone. By now I’m running a little late for my very important date. I realize when I get to the front door (again) that Stan is looking at me from the passenger seat of my car. Ok then (again) it’s not that far! I can do this.

It was just about to the curve of stones that signify that I’m almost close enough to hold on to my actual car on one side and my actual house on the other side, when my legs kind of lost their will to be legs and I started to go down. Now, if you are a human who falls often (whether or not you are luckily enough to have MS) you know that there are good ways to fall and bad ways to fall. My friend Sandy throws her purse to the ground with great vigor as she’s going down. We’re not quite sure why (perchance to have both hands available for maximum impact support) but I’ve witnessed this with my own two eyes and it is nothing if not an impressive strategy. I have nothing in my hands but my keys and my iPhone. I panicked.

In no particular order the following thoughts raced through my broken brain;

  • omg I’m going to fall in front of not one but TWO teams of construction workers. IN MY FRONT YARD.
  • omg one of them might have to carry me to my porch like that one time that moving company guy told me not to worry when he attempted to pick me up – “I was gonna move couches all day, lady, I think I can handle you.” Um. Right. So not a compliment, dude but thanks anyway.
  • OMG I AM GOING TO END UP BACK IN THE HOSPITAL THIS CANNOT HAPPEN.
  • omg I am going to miss my appointment with my precious and this also CANNOT HAPPEN.

My lizard brain took over. My feet started some bizarre combination of random jump moves that may have resembled someone having a fit and trying to tap dance simultaneously. At the very same time, my arms begin to windmill because somehow, my obviously broken brain thinks this will help save me.

My arms and my legs are now moving in many directions all at the same time trying to keep my face from hitting that little strip of craggy concrete that is my driveway. From my mouth is coming a sound something akin to a squeak, or moan, or some animal noise that I am trying not to make too loudly so as not to attract the attention of the teams of construction workers.

I didn’t fall.

It was a goddamned straight up MS miracle. But I didn’t succeed in not attracting the attention of the construction workers at both houses who commenced to applaud. Had this been an actual Olympic sport, I’d probably  have seen them hold up cards giving me low scores for technical difficulty but all 10’s across the board for artistic interpretation of falling on your ass in your own front yard.

I get to my car, my heart is racing and my hands are shaking. Stan looks at me from the passenger seat and practically laughs. I text Cheryl to let her know I am on my way but I may be late because I had yet to pick up my drugs at the pharmacy and I may or may not have legs that will allow me to both get to the pharmacy AND TO  Cheryl’s office. I suggest we might have our session by phone.

Not a second goes by when I get a response: “Oh my…and what’s worse (not really) I’m in Paris, mon amis.”

Um. Yeah. She definitely told me about this. She planned this trip as a re-do of her birthday celebration that she was not well enough to enjoy when it had been her actual birthday. I’ve told you before that Cheryl, also by coincidence, has MS. I cannot tell you which milestone birthday she was celebrating because she’d probably fly home right now and kill me, but rest assured we had discussed this schedule change in our last session (you know the one? I cried for an hour straight).

I knew damn well about her big trip to Paris. We talked about my own trip to Paris not that many years ago. I completely forgot all of those details until I got her text.

I took my life in my hands for nothing. I walked like a hard core afternoon drunk into the pharmacy to get my drugs for the dizzies and the sickies. I just couldn’t wait for those drugs. Those drugs are currently vital to my days and nights. Then I had to conquer my fear and get myself back in my damn house taking the opposite path as pictured above without once again providing several construction crews with yet even more comedic material.

I take so much for granted. I just think…of course I can do that! But when I can’t? I really can’t. There is exactly zero gray area. The problem is, it’s also impossible to know when my legs are suddenly going to turn into useless, twitching lumps off uselessness. It kind of just happens. And here’s the kicker! Stan doesn’t really help. If he did, I would take him with me everywhere I go! But I did use him when I got back home again and I was concentrating so hard on how to walk with Stan in my hand, that I almost straight up tripped up my front steps. Thank goodness for that very sturdy (and quite pricey) wrought iron railing I had put in a few years ago.

I’m really ready for my next infusion, thankyouverymuch. Bethy Bright could use a break that doesn’t involve one of her legs or facial bones. And there. I probably did it again. I cursed myself by complaining, acting as if things just couldn’t get any worse. Believe me. I know they can and in a blink of an eye. I see your posts and comments about sudden symptoms that have you not able to walk at all! It can always, always get worse.

But here’s to hoping that I will still have it in me to find the humor in those situations when it does get worse. Cause I still have moves. As it turns out.

I cut my hair (and I didn’t post a pic)

This landed on my doorstep, along with some amazing fall treats. Much like pennies from heaven in the middle of a very bad spell.

This might seem like no big deal to you. If you know me, you’re probably thinking, “Well thank god because who gives crap about your hair? You’re way too obsessed with your damn hair.” And you would be right.

The thing is, I’ve taken no less than 300 different selfies of my new non-blonde hair from 30 different angles and in several different locations and lighting situations and I couldn’t bring myself to post a single one.

There isn’t a filter known to the Internets that could get me to feel differently about any of those (to me) hideous photos. I should note here that it’s not because I don’t love my new haircut! I do love my new, shorter, much darker ‘do. I haven’t not had color on my hair since I was probably 19 years old. I’m kind of shocked by how dark my “real” hair is. There’s still  little blonde left on the ends. To get rid of all of it, I’d have to buzz my entire head and I couldn’t bring myself to do that. But as of my next haircut all of the blonde will be completely gone. I kind of can’t wait. Then maybe I’ll do it all over again. Who knows?

I do love my new hair cut but I pretty much loathe the rest and I couldn’t bring myself to post a single shot.

I swear to you, this isn’t one of those posts where I am asking, nay, practically begging someone out there to reassure me that I am truly not a monster; that my eyes are broken; or that my perceptions don’t mirror reality, so give it up already Beth. This is decidedly not one of those posts. You might say those things, but you should know that there is no amount of protestations that will make me see myself any differently right now, or maybe ever.

I know it’s in my head. It’s been in my head for nearly ALL of my very impressive 50 years of life. It’s the barometer that I’ve always cared about, the only fact of my existence that gave me any reassurance that things would always be ok for me somehow because at least I was pretty. I’d always have that (even if I couldn’t actually see it with my own eyes). It didn’t matter. I’d have to take your word for it but that was almost good enough. I used to take and post all of those selfies because for that instant in time, I could see it. That thing you always told me in the comment section!

Being pretty was critical to me. It was, sometimes in my own twisted psyche, the only thing that mattered – why people wanted to hire me, like me, date me, marry me, reward me, give me chances…all of it. But I couldn’t see it for myself. I needed other people to tell me, show me, make me believe it somehow.

I know! This is pure insanity hence the reason I’ve been in therapy for fifteen years and the reason why at 50 years old I still have such a twisted view of the world. Pretty never mattered as much as I thought it did. It never mattered to anyone else as much as it mattered to me. I clung to it after every heart break and disappointment, every bump in every road. The first thing I needed to know after being dumped by a boyfriend was “Is she prettier than me?” I mean, good lord. That’s messed up.

I’ve read a few articles this week about whether or not MS ruined a person’s marriage. I get that and I can understand how hard having MS would be in a marriage or partnership. As you all know, I’ve often said out loud and with great vigor that the only thing that might make this whole late-in-life diagnosis of MS worse for me would be to have to go through all of this mess along side of and in front of another human. It’s too hard to imagine trying to be a good partner to another person when I’m so openly struggling to live on my own. I feel terrible for people who’s MS has so clearly messed up something so critical in most people’s lives. This disease takes so much.

I’m letting it ruin my relationship with the one who matters most. Myself. I can barely look at myself. I struggle every time I have to leave the house. I struggle even more when I’m forced to try and make any effort at all. Like on the days I actually make it into the office. I put makeup on and choose an outfit that works with my very sensible shoe choices – and pack up my backpack and walk out the door like it was any other day. But it has yet to feel even remotely close to any other day. I’ve begun to wonder if this is going to happen, and potentially get worse, after future relapses. I being to wonder if I can actually survive something like that.

There’s nothing attractive about pulling your bright green plastic puke bag from your backpack when the random wave of dizziness and nausea take over. Nothing can make you feel pretty after that.

When I got home from my pedicure on Saturday afternoon, the note above was in a bag left at my front door, along with a plant and some fall treats. The card fell out of the handwritten note when I opened it. I picked it up, read it, and promptly burst into tears. I never burst into tears. Well, almost never but it’s gotten a lot more prevalent since my diagnosis on December 15 of 2015 that I randomly burst into tears. But this time the tears just sprang out of my eyes, I didn’t fight them or even attempt to stop them, not that I could have if I’d even tried.

This face, this body, all distorted by high dose steroids, has become my enemy. It makes me fall down and not be able to get up. It makes me want to sleep 24 hours a day. It makes me hurt and spasm and tremor without warning. It makes me want to never leave the house when it’s hot outside and never actually leave the house for days on end this last goddamned hot, humid summer.

This face looks so much older than it ever has. I used to take great pride when people would tell me how I didn’t look anything like my real age. As if I had any control over the DNA my parents gave me so graciously! It made me proud.

Nobody has said that to me in a while now. If they did, I’d probably laugh right out loud. I might not look 50 years old but I feel like I’m 550 years old and nobody can tell me they can’t see that written all over my face. I’ve got steroid gut. I’ve got gray hair and I don’t even care enough to cover it up. I’ve begun to hate putting on makeup not just because I know I’ll have to have the energy to take it all off again at the end of the day – but because I don’t think it’s fun anymore. It’s no fun at all putting makeup on this face. In fact, it just pisses me off.

I miss myself so much! I haven’t seen myself in such a long time, that when I read this card yesterday, it was the first time it dawned on me that maybe it shouldn’t matter to me as much as it did. I want to be a bigger, better person (not just in my clothing sizes) where none of this matters to me. I sat in Cheryl’s office last time, I actually made it there to her office before I threw up, and I cried for a solid hour. WHY could I still care about all of this stupid shit when I have actual REAL things to worry about now? Why can’t I get over this once and for all? Why does it matter so goddamn much? No matter how much I resist it, how many times I’ve written about it both here and in my journal where things get a whole lot uglier…it’s always there. Like an irritating itch you can’t quite scratch for over 50 years.

OK. So here’s the best of the worst set of selfies I’ve ever taken since the advent of the selfie about 10 years ago. I do love my new hair. I do love seeing what color nature intended me to be. But I’d be a liar if i didn’t admit that I’m including it here, way down here at the bottom of my post, because then it won’t haunt me every time I look at my blog comments.

At least it’s finally convertible weather? For me anyway.

Effing MS. It ruins so many things. I need to figure out a way to not let it ruin the me I have left in me. It was never about the way I looked. I wish I had known that earlier.

A visit with the wizard

I was nervous looking at my calendar and realizing I had an appointment with The Great Scott yesterday.

I always have this irrational fear that I'm not doing my MS quite right. I used to walk out of that office feeling like a failure when TGS would ask me, "When was the last time you walked a mile, Maribeth?" It took everything I had in me not to burst out laughing, not in a good way, and then lunge across his desk and go for his throat. I'd leave feeling like a failure. I should be doing this whole MS thing better. Getting myself checked into the hospital as an in-patient while TGS was off on vacation felt like the ultimate failure.

The thing is, though, without me noticing,  The Great Scott and I have started a more productive phase of our relationship somehow. He has finally gotten to the point where he knows I'm no push over and he also knows that nobody wants me to be better at having MS more than ME.

I think he's pegged me for the chronic over-achiever I am. He seems to finally understand how much I hate this entire thing. I hate it from beginning to end. Being in the same place has allowed us to move on to  a new phase of our relationship. The one where he stops trying to bullshit me about walking a mile and starts talking to me straight about more realistic things.

I got taken into the inner sanctum early by a nurse, and I had left my bag and my phone out in the lobby with my nephew who served as my ride and support for the day since I am not driving-ready just yet. I still get too dizzy when I'm moving around to trust myself behind the wheel of my car. So I just had to sit there, in the sterile room, quietly with my thoughts while I awaited the appearance of TGS.

I steeled myself for the lecture. I wondered how he would react when I freaked the hell out when he asked me when the last time I walked a mile was. That quiet time had me all balled up and anxious. That was probably the longest I've ever been separated from my phone in…years.

A soft tap on the door preceded his grand entrance and the first thing I noticed was that TGS was tan. He was looking all browned up and healthy and I suddenly got a mental image of him wearing madras shorts on some fancy Caribbean beach somewhere sipping a mai tai and I almost giggled.

"Well, there she is," he said while ushering in two other doctors. "I'm running a little behind, Maribeth, so Dr. A and Dr. B here are going to talk through the progression of events that brought you to the hospital and then I'll come back and we can talk next steps."

Dr.'s A and B were very kindly young men. I had to go through the whole progression of events from my first Ocrevus infusion in May…then on to my landslide in June resulting in my short stint on high-dose oral steroids, and my subsequent slide into feeling slightly off balance and thinking maybe I needed a cane and/or physical therapy, to the fateful day when I woke up all wonky and sick that landed me in that hell hole they call a Level One Trauma Center for four very long and miserable days.

Then I had to explain how I was discharged without so much as a strip of paper or any directions on what to do next. I also explained how the three different neurologists that I saw in the clink had three different theories on what landed me there.

Dr. A explained, "The doctors in the hospital checked you for stroke, which this clearly was not. They diagnosed you with vestibular neuronitus not a relapse of your MS. I'm not sure what I think about that, but we will see what Dr. Scott has to say." And as if on cue, after a soft tap-tap on the door, in walked in Malibu TGS looking relaxed and friendly.

They all conferred, all of my many doctors, and The Great Tan Scott looked at me and said quite matter-of-factly, "So the doctors in the hospital who saw you said you have vestibular neuronitus. I disagree one hundred percent. Those doctors were wrong."

I said, "Well, respectfully, my first reaction to hearing that news today was…how dumb. When you hear hoof beats, think horses not zebras. It made zero sense to me."

I actually made TGS laugh!

"I was about to use a similar analogy but yours works just fine. This is obviously an ongoing relapse, Maribeth. You've had a rough time. But I still think the new goo is going to help you," he said.

"I feel like this whole thing is one big blur of really bad timing," I said to him. And he agreed with me again! I am now officially in crazy town. Vacation must agree with The Great Scott.

"I think once you get beyond this vertigo, you'll start getting back to a better place but this is a rough patch. Nearly 40% of my MS patients experience this kind of thing. A lesion the size of a pin prick could be present in your brain stem in the region of the vestibular nerve (since you already have so many lesions in the brain and C-spine, this is the obvious conclusion). The lesion could be the size of a pin prick, not visible on your MRI, but that doesn't mean it's not there. Or as you put it, horses for sure and definitely not zebras," said TGS.

Other little gems he dropped on me during our brief visit (in his words):

To me…"Vertigo can be stubborn. It can last weeks, or months and even years. You can't do anything about it but wait it out. If you're not feeling better in  few weeks we may consider an outpatient stint at the Vestibular Rehabilitation Unit at Allegheny General. But that shouldn't be necessary." (Good christ on a cracker…a few more weeks of this?!?! I am in danger of losing my mind if I cannot get back to my life sooner than that. I think the look on my face conveys this reaction completely, therefore I do not verbalize it.)

To the other doctors… "Maribeth here has progressed a bit more rapidly than is usual for a newly diagnosed MS patient. She's still in the thick of it and is struggling with a higher than normal disability level than is usual for a newly diagnosed patient. Hence our aggressive approach to her therapy." (Yikes. He never said that out loud to me before, but knowing he thinks the same things I've been thinking somehow made me feel validated.)

To me again…"You've had a rough time. I am confident the new goo is going to be great for you. I remain fully optimistic that we did the right thing. Your disease is just a bit more active than usual so it's going to take you a little longer. Usually new patients level off within five years or so. So it's coming for you, the feeling better part, it's just that you have no choice but to wait it out." (FIVE YEARS NOW?!? Jesus. I'm going to feel better when I'm 55 years old?!?? Good lord.)

To the other doctors again… "What is the mechanism that makes Ampyra work Dr.A?" And Dr. A clearly had no idea because he was literally stuttering, so I piped up, "It's a potassium channel blocker. It smooths out the electrical signals between my brain and my legs. It only works for 30% of patients who try it but it clearly works for me since when I don't take it, I cannot walk." The Great Scott looks at me sort of surprised, like, and says, "Well, you're exactly right. Are you looking for a job now, Maribeth?" (He made a joke! A funny! Malibu Scott is a lot more mellow than pasty not-tan Great Scott. Also I think Dr. B may be mute because I've not heard him speak this entire time.)

Back to me again… "There is no reason for us not to continue to be optimistic, here, Maribeth. I know this has been discouraging. Hospital visits are not fun. But if we're patient, I think the new goo is going to get you to a new normal that you can manage. Listen, today, fewer than  10% of newly diagnosed MS patients end up in a wheelchair. The therapies are so much better now than what we had to work with in the past. A wheel chair used to be a forgone conclusion but it's now very unlikely. I know you are discouraged. But I remain optimistic on your behalf." (Well, at least one of us is. I guess I'll take it.)

On the topic of PT…"Let's give you time to heal and get back to your office first. You need to take this slow. Do not prolong the situation by pushing yourself too hard. Rest and time are the only things that are going to help this situation. I suggest you try and give yourself plenty of both." (Wait, WHAT?!? This, from when-did-you-last-walk-a-mile-guy? I am so surprised I am rendered speechless. A rarity for me. TGS seems shocked by this as well.)

And SCENE.

My nephew and I went and had lunch after my appointment. Being a passenger in a car was not great for me. I was super woozy. All of that walking around in the outside world, where I've been absent lately, turned out to be a bit much for me. I realized I had a raging head ache. And I was feeling even more nauseous than usual. After my nephew helped me with a few small chores and many laughs (that kid…he cracks me up), I planted myself in my living room chair – the one that I feel might swallow me whole one day since I've been spending so very much time sitting in it. My chair and me are becoming one. I try to look at my computer to answer a few work email, and I realize it's no good. I am going to be sick.

I drag myself through my kitty chores, get upstairs and put on my jammies and prepare to lay flat on my back until the sick feeling goes away when another more powerful wave of nausea hits me. I dig in my bedside table for the handy puke bags I stole from the hospital, and you know what happened next.

I felt immediately better. I lay down. I read a short three chapters of my next book…and I go to sleep. It was just starting to get dark when I put my book down. I didn't care.

I'm following doctor's orders. When The Great Scott tells you to rest and take it easy, you rest and take it easy. I am going to try and cultivate his infectious optimism and hope that I am back in outside-world-form within a few weeks. I know it seems like a really long time. Because it is a really long time. What MS has taught me this week is that I really have no true notion of what a long time really is. A few weeks that feel like a lifetime? It could be worse. It could always be a whole lot worse.

One more tiny piece of news.

When we got back to my house after our post-doctor appointment lunch, I had a few packages on my front porch. One of them was marked with the words "fashionablecanes.com." My nephew grabbed it up and was like, "Yo, let's see if this cane is really fashionable enough for you, AB." And we laughed. We opened the box and we met my first cane.

I'm calling him Stan. He is rather basic, but reliable. He isn't flashy but he will help me when I'm no longer unable to drive, but I might still need some support to keep from holding on to walls, buildings and random strangers whilst walking around downtown Pittsburgh.

I still need to get the hang of walking with Stan. Somehow, I feel less awkward drunk walking around town grabbing on to random stuff than I do when trying to walk with Stan around my living room. I'm sure I will get used to him.

I'm a loner, we know this, but sometimes you need a little help from a friend named Stan. And Malibu Great Scott. I'm going to miss his tan when I see him again in November.

Tales from the puffy village

That's it up there. The puffy village. The place I love most in the world, where I come for comfort, where I lay my head when the world out there becomes too much. An old boyfriend dubbed my overly comfortable bed the puffy village a long time ago because he said it was so insanely comfortable you could live there happily for all time. The boyfriend is long gone. The puffy remains.

I take a lot of care making her as comfy as possible. I choose my sheets and bedding with obsessive care the way I used to select designer shoes. Currently, I'm in a mixed print phase.
Just looking at this picture makes me happy.

Mostly.

See, I've spent a whole lot of time in the puffy since being sprung from the hospital on Monday evening. I mean, I'm glad I got out. I couldn't stand the idea of that hideous torture chamber they call Allegheny General Hospital for even one more second. I guess I thought it would be better at home. I'd feel better. The ruse I performed for the overly attentive PT team would turn out to be real and I'd go back to being able to stand up, walk around, bend over touch my toes and do a little jig. But as I'm sure you've figured out by now, things actually haven't gotten much better at all.

I'm so dizzy it's ridiculous. I can barely remain on my feet. I hold on to anything and everything in order to do basic things like walk to the bathroom or down the steps to the kitchen. My legs are weak on top of the dizziness I feel in my brain. I feel like my house has been transformed into a fancy house boat that happens to always traverse super rough waters.

The antivert I'm taking for the dizziness makes me tired and doesn't seem to help the vertigo much at all. I haven't left the house since getting home Monday night. I've been asleep approximately 85% of the time since. I'm still in pajamas all day and I've yet to risk the shower. I'm deathly afraid of falling and ending up in the hospital again – and lord knows, that's just not gonna be something I allow to happen.

Family and friends are at my beck and call to handle chores, to feed me, to make deliveries and make me laugh. Mostly they're there to help me up and down the steps and take care of my very spoiled menagerie of felines. Damn, I have a lot of cats.

I can't read because my right eye is wonky. I can type if I keep one eye closed. Television is hard, again, because of the wonky eye. My list of things I can do consecutively has grown shorter. I'm down to one thing at a time before I need to rest. I used to have at least two things in me, sometimes even three.

It's hitting me hard because I'm finally realizing that this just is what it is! The part I thought was the worst, where I was waiting for the magical drug to kick in and make me more human, that was the good part! I thought it was the bad part. I thought I could only get better.

Turns out, it's super easy to get so much worse. I wonder how long it's going to take me to bounce back from this episode? What will my new normal be? Will I ever get back to my doing three small things in a row self? How long will I be the queen of the puffy village?

At what point do I simply cease to exist?

I know. I'm super dramatic. Spending so much time alone in deep thought whilst listening to one's body fail all around her will do that to a girl. And that pisses me off even more!

I'm the queen of the loners! Ask anyone who knows me and they will tell you how much I enjoy my own company. It's probably a giant character flaw but it's true. These last few days I feel like I'm in the twilight zone where I'm walking from familiar room to familiar room, holding on to walls and chairs, looking for the person I used to be and not finding her. There's someone else here now. She can barely stand up and her hair is atrocious. Don't even look at her eyebrows! The horrors.

I keep telling myself this too shall pass. That's what everyone, literally everyone I know both in real life and in MS life, has told me and I believe those people. They're so much better at this MS thing than I am. They've gone to the darkest places and clawed their way back. I keep thinking I've accepted this thing in my life then something happens that turns my life ass over teacups and I'm back at the beginning looking around thinking, "what the hell just happened?"

I just want to not be dizzy so badly! I want to will it so with my broken brain. I want to sleep the sick away and wake up magically feeling a little worse for wear but generally just a little gimpy and slow. I thought that was the bad part! I thought things could only get better. As if I didn't know the truth.

The truth is that was probably as good as it gets. That whole time before this hospital incident when I felt like I'd hit rock bottom wasn't even close to the bottom! I'm looking at getting my first assistive walking device (form tbd hopefully with the help of some outpatient PT once I feel a bit more able). Once I get a cane, I'll probably need a walker soon after that. The wheel chair can't be too far behind right? At least a scooter…

I know how lucky I am to have the luxury of sleep in the world's most comfortable bed. After being deprived of sleep for so long, being in the puffy feels almost like heaven. And yet the whole thing changes a little tiny bit when you realize you're not in the bed by choice. You're in the bed because your body flat gave up on you. No combination of high thread count mixed print sheets can help you in that situation. You just have to suck it up. Try to be grateful and go back to sleep.

Every time I close my eyes these last few days I have this intense hope in my heart that when my eyes open again I'll be off this houseboat version of my life and back to my happy place where a shower isn't life threatening and awesome sheets are enough to make me feel happy.

Until then, here I lay. Flat on my back. Cultivating happy hopeful thoughts and functioning as a speed bump for my very many cats. It could be worse. It could be much worse.

Remember the hospital? Exactly. Shivers.

Life on the inside, part deaux

So as most of you already know, I was rudely awakened at 3:45am with the arrival of my first roommate. One of only three such roommates I’ve ever had in my life who were not related to me in some way. 

It was rude. Bright lights. Outside voices asking about symptoms, the ins and outs of advanced directives, the ordering of snacks, the assemblage of various monitors and beeping apparatus. So. Yeah. No sleep again for this girl. My roomie is really nice. But now I have to hate her extra large because she’s getting out of here at 2pm. Today. Why?!? Why not ME?!? And yes. I am a bad person. But at least I admit it. 

I made some progress today, however. I posed what I thought was a perfectly logical and valid point to my neuro attending team. Why in the world would anyone give any human being a mega dose of Solumedrol at midnight? I mean, that practically ensures a sleepless night when sleepless nights are already likely based on my random self inflating bed with a motor located right under where my head lays each night. It’s like a water bed but with air. It gives me straight up motion sickness. But that is neither here nor there. Solumedrol at midnight! I’m no doctor. But that just seems like every kind of bad medical idea anyone’s ever had. 

The answer? Well. Because that’s what time the order went in. Oh. Right. That makes total sense then. 

My answer? So change the mother humping order you fools! I want my mega roids at 6am and 6pm. Period. There will be one day where I’m on a little extra roid juice, admittedly that’s not ideal. But want to know what’s an even worse idea? Getting pumped full of steroids and also expecting to sleep. Want to know what makes all MS symptoms worse? Two things. The horrible relentless heat. And, lack of proper rest. 

Proper rest tonight, in particular, is critical. 

Tomorrow I am being evaluated by the PT team. It’s up to them entirely whether or not I get released after my last Solumedrol infusion tomorrow at 6pm OR if they decide I am a danger to myself, they will keep me here until they can find me a room with an in-patient rehab unit. 

Oh. Hells no. Hell hell hell NO. I am not allowing that to happen. I’m adamantly opposed to in-patient anything after this debacle. No way. I’ll use my roid induced strength to stage a violent coup resulting in me wobble walking to the nearest exit and flagging me down a damn Uber. 

So I’m gonna take as many drugs as I can to help me sleep, even if I have to have family members sneak them in via body cavities, so I am well rested and not quite so wobbly tomorrow for my big test. I’m definitely doing better. I mean I can probably walk to the bathroom myself if they’d just let me. I haven’t thrown up in 24 hours at least. I’m practically an elite athlete right now in MS terms. Maybe ginger ale is some kind of magical life elixir and I just never knew about it before. 

I’m making up a new song. It’s by Beth Street and it’s called “No Wobbly” and it goes a little something like this…

I like the way you work it (no wobbly), girl ya got to walk it out. I like the way you work it (no wobbly) girl ya got to balance out. She’s got dirty hair rolling with the phatness. Solumedrol giving her the head fits. Street knowledge by the pound. Seen ’em close up with her face on the ground. But got to get her home stat so no wobbly’s where it’s at. 

My most sincere apologies to Blackstreet. But shorty’s got to get home before she loses her damn mind and Wobblies stand between me and that goal. All no wobbly vibes coming my way will be graciously accepted. 

I will not be an in-patient anywhere ever again as god is my witness. 

So I have to roll now. I have to plan this going away party for my roomie. Drink ALL the ginger ale. Load up on roids. (I was told I may require a xanax after my short term roid loading that has to happen today to get me on my new schedule. That should be interesting.)

And tonight is turkey dinner. I mean who’s really winning here? Turkeys are great walkers! It’s gotta be a good sign. 

#nowobblies

Sing it with me, folks. The puffy village is calling my name and I must get back to my precious before I go all Gollum on some PT hobbits tomorrow. 

The most important rule of MS Club

I almost hesitate to say this out loud (or in writing, which is the same thing, really, maybe even worse)…but I’ve been feeling a little better these last few days. Not “jump out of bed and run a marathon” better. Not “these boots are made for walking” better. Nothing quite like that.

Just not quite so bad, better. I took a shower yesterday. I didn’t feel like I was going to perish. I didn’t have to take a nap after my shower. Also, I woke up several days in a row without the aid of an alarm while it was actually still morning. I was on “vacation” from work last week so I had the luxury of not setting an alarm. Even so, I found myself awake and quasi-mobile well before noon. Imagine! Also, I noticed last week that I haven’t been eating Ibruprofen like skittles.

Strange things are afoot.

Do you know what happens when you’ve felt like utter excrement for so long and you start to feel even a teeny tiny bit better? You want to do ALL OF THE THINGS. ALL. OF. THE. THINGS. Every last one of the things. But then you remember that you’re a member of MS Club.

The Most Important Rule of MS Club is you need to never forget that you’re in MS Club.

This means something pretty simple. Definitely do NOT give in to the urge to believe you can suddenly do all of the things. And for the love of god, don’t try to do even two of the things at the same time on the same day. Just ease on into the whole not feeling like death warmed over thing and take it slow. Very, very slowly. Do not push yourself to pre-MS levels of expectation thinking some crazy ass miracle has occurred.

Just pump your brakes and take it slow.

Go to bed early after a long day in the office (I wore makeup and clothing and walked to and from my office without falling and omg it was awesome).

Do not stay up late writing all of the blog posts that have been swimming around in your broken brain for days now. Just jot down some ideas so you don’t forget what they were and then GO TO SLEEP. You need to work again tomorrow.

In that spirit, following are some of the blog posts I want to write but will not write on this night because I am a responsible adult with Multiple Sclerosis. Consider it a kind of “coming attractions” preview:

– Is it MS? Or is it middle age? An exploration of the age old answers to the burning question: what is really happening to me?!?

– Not all Flat Shoes are Created Equal: an exhaustive treatise on why flat black sandals can be almost as bad as four inch heels.

– How many days can one stay inside one’s home with the air set at 64 degrees before one is officially considered a shut in?

– Cane/hiking poles/rollator…which MS mobility aid will I be least likely to injure myself using and how does one decide?

– When your doctor cancels your appointment without explanation is it ok to send them a bill for your pain and suffering? And other MS Specialist dilemmas.

– What does “feeling better” really mean? Better than what? An existential debate.

– Witty replies to the question, “how are you?” That are not instant conversation killers.

…these and many more intriguing topics will be explored in future episodes of bethybrightanddark.com.

But they will not be written on this night. On this night I’m going to allow myself to read one chapter of my book before I close my eyes. I’m going to attempt to get a good solid eight to ten hours of sleep. Then I’m going to try to wake up tomorrow, put on suitable outdoor appropriate clothing, drive to my office downtown and attempt to do it all over again. Two days in a row!

Ideally, I will accomplish all of this while also making a better shoe choice than I made today. It’s gonna be awesome.

They like me…

They really like me!

Well. That’s probably going a bit far but I got this in the mail today:


Of course, I have no actual idea how I actually go about getting this fancy new drug, no clue how much it’s gonna cost me or how I actually get the drug into my grubby hands but as you would expect, I’ve already contacted the ever helpful Nurse Carol to ask for her assistance. 

Oh. One more thing. I also have no idea if this drug will work or what it will do to me otherwise, such as side effects etc. I suppose I’ll be finding out. Eventually. Once the magical specialty pharmacy elves deposit my new pills in the stocking that is currently hanging by my fireplace (I’m guessing that’s not how it works at all, but wouldn’t that be nice?)

It’s hard for me to get my head around how a drug can help me to walk better. It’s just so…strange. How is it going to do that exactly? It sounds to me suspiciously like some kind of voodoo trick or a magical elixir that one would purchase from the back of a covered wagon. Do they have a specialty drug that will make me fly too? I would find that claim easier to believe than the idea that I will pop a pill (or two) each day that will suddenly make my legs operate more like legs should.

It’s funny to me how this whole thing plays out. It’s like one giant game. First you try to get the drug. Then you wait for the drug to come (I assume the specialty pharmacy delivers?), then you hold your breath waiting to see if it makes you grow facial hair or a second chin while it’s also trying to help you walk a bit better. 

I guess we’ll see, then, won’t we? Until then, I will wait with baited breath for some sign of what comes next. I’m becoming an excellent waiter.